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‘Baby Driver’ Takes Audiences on a Thrill Ride

Luke DeLeo, Staff Reporter

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The screeching tires, the loud banging sound of guns, and the sound of synced tunes. The expectations the audience had for this film did not disappoint.

“Baby Driver,” a film filled with action and comedy, was written and directed by Edgar Wright. 

Darling and Buddy are a Bonnie-and-Clyde-type couple who love the thrill of killing and stealing. These characters often butt heads with each other in funny banter but also argue about their own safety, which brings the film to a more serious level and makes the characters more human.”

Baby (Ansel Elgort), the protagonist, is an exceptional getaway driver for bank robberies. Throughout this film the audience gets to know Baby and look at his life of crime from his perspective.

This film pulls the audience in from the beginning with an amazing car chase. The music sets the tone for the scene, and the fluidity of the sequences does not fail.

The opening scene dives straight into Baby, who has an amazing skill set, and a group of secondary characters such as Buddy (John Hamm), Darling (Eiza Gonzalez) and Griff (John Bernthal).

The chase scene shows how disconnected Baby is with other people in the group. It’s almost as if he thinks being a getaway driver is a hobby, with his lip syncing of the opening song and his stoic face as the bank robbers flee the authorities.

His overall attitude toward the job affects the outcome in this well-written, well-directed story. Wright tries to make the film fast-paced and keep it that way throughout the film. Including chase scenes throughout the story and adding interesting subplots make the audience stay interested.

The story at first seems predictable but takes a turn three quarters of the way through. With interesting subplots, the movie slows down to establish characters and their stories, which makes the film more than just an overdone action film.

The story has an underlying theme of what is right and what is wrong. Baby comes to a crossroads, distinguishing his actions from the other bank robbers. When a film makes the audience question the actions of a protagonist, it brings realism to the forefront.

The characters in the film have unique qualities. Baby, for example, listens to music with earphones to drown out the ringing in his ears, which he incurred in an accident as a young boy.

Bats, a trigger-happy criminal says what he wants and never apologizes.

Darling and Buddy are a Bonnie-and-Clyde-type couple who love the thrill of killing and stealing.

These characters often butt heads in funny banter but also argue about their own safety, which brings the film to a more serious level and makes the characters more human.

The music in “Baby Driver” includes some classic rock songs such as “Brighton Rock” by Queen. The music will bring a smile to any movie fan — a good blend of fast-paced rock and slow ’70s jazz. The film can be considered a pseudo-musical because music is an essential part.

Wright uses stunt drivers instead of CGI to perform the awesome maneuvers portrayed by Baby, which adds realism.

“Baby Driver” makes the audience want to be Baby and drive awesome cars and do cool stunts. It connects the audience with the morality of choice and what is right and wrong. Not a lot of films can make characters so messed up be likeable too.

“Baby Driver” is a fantastic film anyone can enjoy.

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‘Baby Driver’ Takes Audiences on a Thrill Ride