Reverbs from the ECHO Chamber — a Q & A with Senior Dalton McCauley

Braden Barry, Staff Reporter

Trinity senior Dalton McCauley

Another in a continuing series of Q & A interviews with Trinity spring sports student-athletes.

Senior Dalton McCauley spoke about his years as a key member of Trinity’s Bass Fishing Team, headed by Coach Mike Chancellor.

Q: When did you start fishing?

A: Since I could hold a fishing pole in my hand. It has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. My dad would take me to ponds as a young kid, and even though I could not cast, if he hooked a fish, he would give me the pole and let me reel it in.

Q: What kind of fishing do you mainly do?

A: I mainly bass fish, but I have been catfishing, bluegill fishing, and even crappie fishing. My dad and I went crappie fishing about two weeks ago and had our limit within the first hour!

Q: What is it about fishing that you find most appealing?

A: Just being on the water in general is very peaceful and satisfying to me. There is no place I would rather be than on a bass boat. Nothing compares to the feeling of a fish biting on the other end of your line because as you set the hook, you don’t know whether its going to be a six-pounder or a tiny 12-inch fish. This alone drives me back to the water every chance or opportunity that I have. 

I highly considered going to some of the more prestigious fishing colleges throughout the state such as Campbellsville University or Murray State. However, I have to think about my future as an engineer before I decide primarily on bass fishing. I chose to go to the University of Louisville because they have one of the best engineering programs in the state. I will continue to fish competitive tournaments through college there.”

— Trinity senior Dalton McCauley

Q: When did you start fishing competitively?

A: My dad has always fished competitively, and since I was a kid, I wanted to get into the money aspect of it like he was. It was seventh grade when I fished my first tournament on Taylorsville Lake. Although we did not win any money that tournament, the following year I fished in a series during the summer called the Tuesday Night Classic. I can remember my dad and I coming in second place and cashing a $650 check. All the older men looked at me like I was crazy when my dad had me weigh in the bag that night. They must have been thinking, “Did that little kid really catch those fish?” After this, it no longer was going fishing just for fun. When I was on the water, it meant business and I was determined to win.

Q: Who has taught you the most about fishing?

A: My dad has taught me just about everything I know when it comes to fishing. He has been fishing competitively since the ’80s and ’90s and is very experienced. He has been my boat captain for all four years at Trinity and practically helped coach the team some.

Q: What has been your biggest accomplishment in fishing?

A: I qualified for the state championship three years in a row out of Region 2. This is extremely hard to do, and my junior year, I also qualified for the national championship on Pickwick Lake in Alabama. I looked forward to qualifying for state and even possibly nationals once again this year; however, the tournament was supposed to be Apr. 25 and was canceled due to Covid-19. This is heartbreaking to me, but I plan to continue my tournament fishing throughout college.

Q: What is the biggest fish you ever caught?

A: The biggest bass I have ever caught out of a lake was in Green River Lake two years ago. It weighed 6.29 pounds. The biggest bass I have ever caught in a pond was 6.88 pounds last year.

Q: Where is your favorite place to fish?

A: My favorite place to bass fish is Lake Cumberland. This mainly is because you can catch all three species of bass (largemouth, smallmouth, and spotted) to weigh in at a tournament. It also is one of the most beautiful fisheries in the state and is huge, with miles of different banks to fish. Cumberland is beautiful on both ends with a lot of crystal-clear water.

Q: How often do you go fishing?

A: From March through May (during the spawn) I will fish just about every day I physically can. If I can’t make it to the lake or take the boat, I will go to some ponds and get my practice in. Even in the summertime I will still get to the lake to fish at least once or twice a week. However, sometime during the fall, I will take a little time to set aside for deer hunting and focus on that during November. Fishing is what I have the most fun doing, and it is one of the biggest parts of my life.

Q: Are you going to still fish competitively after high school?

A: I highly considered going to some of the more prestigious fishing colleges throughout the state such as Campbellsville University or Murray State. However, I have to think about my future as an engineer before I decide primarily on bass fishing. I chose to go to the University of Louisville because they have one of the best engineering programs in the state. I will continue to fish competitive tournaments through college there.