Protesters in St. Matthews Speak Out for Equal Treatment

Protesters+in+St.+Matthews+Speak+Out+for+Equal+Treatment

photo by Preston Romanov '20

Preston Romanov '20, Editor in Chief

“8 minutes and 46 seconds.” That was the time of a video shot by a bystander who witnessed a death in front of his own eyes. Moments after the May 25 video was shot and uploaded to social media platforms, it went viral. The death of George Floyd as Minneapolis police office Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck sparked protests around the country and beyond.

In the wake of a global pandemic that has brought havoc and lockdowns for hundreds of millions of Americans around the country – and resulted in more than 120,000 deaths — people around the country continue to protest the treatment of African Americans by some in law enforcement.

We are still far away from being past racism. We are not past it at all. We have a lot of work to do, but I think this is taking a good step forward.”

— Mckenzie DeBorde

 

One death hit home in Louisville and has become part of the cry around the world for justice — that of Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old African-American woman who was fatally shot by Louisville Metro Police Department officers during a no-knock warrant on Mar. 13.

A peaceful protest was held in the streets of St. Matthews on May 31, calling for justice in the Taylor case. ⁣ 

Those taking part in St. Matthews called for change. Horns honked in support as drivers passed. The St. Matthews police assisted the protesters, and people dropped off water and snacks.  

“We are here today for justice for Breonna Taylor but also so many more,” Mackenzie DeBorde, a St. Matthews resident, said.  “It’s all about equality and every human — all lives don’t matter until black lives matter; there’s a lot of truth in that, and it’s been made more apparent.” 

Since that day in St. Matthews, the National Guard and a curfew have come and gone.  Still, people gather to speak out about the need for equal treatment for all.

DeBorde said, “Everybody here wants to come out and protest peacefully and exercise their First Amendment right. I think it’s a really good and positive move. We are still far away from being past racism. We are not past it at all. We have a lot of work to do, but I think this is taking a good step forward.”